Posted by: Matt | July 22, 2007

Making the List

Another week, more books. This time I have a couple of sci-fi books to add and one non-fiction that sounds absolutely fascinating.

  • Declare by Tim Powers – “Andrew Hale, an Oxford lecturer who first entered Her Majesty’s Secret Intelligence Service as an 18-year-old schoolboy, is called back to finish a job that culminated in a deadly mission on Mount Ararat after the end of World War II. Now it’s 1963, and cold war politics are behind the decision to activate Hale for another attempt to complete Operation Declare and bring down the Communist government before Moscow can harness the powerful, other-worldly forces concentrated on the summit of the mountain, supposed site of the landing of Noah’s ark. James Theodora is the über-spymaster whose internecine rivalry with other branches of the Secret Intelligence Service traps Hale between a rock and a hard place, literally and figuratively. There’s plenty of mountain and desert survival stuff here, a plethora of geopolitical and theological history, and a big serving of A Thousand and One Nights, which is Hale’s guide to the meteorites, drogue stones, and amonon plant, which figure in this complicated tale. There’s a love story, too, and a bizarre twist on the Kim Philby legend that posits both Philby and Hale as the only humans who can tame the powers of the djinns who populate Mount Ararat.” I’ve read one Powers book so far and quite enjoyed it, figured I should add another to the list.
  • Neuromancer by William Gibson – “Case was the hottest computer cowboy cruising the information superhighway–jacking his consciousness into cyberspace, soaring through tactile lattices of data and logic, rustling encoded secrets for anyone with the money to buy his skills. Then he double-crossed the wrong people, who caught up with him in a big way–and burned the talent out of his brain, micron by micron. Banished from cyberspace, trapped in the meat of his physical body, Case courted death in the high-tech underworld. Until a shadowy conspiracy offered him a second chance–and a cure–for a price….” This is one of the novels that started the cyber-punk subgenre. I’d been resisting it for awhile, now it goes on the list.
  • The World Without Us by Alan Weisman – “If a virulent virus—or even the Rapture—depopulated Earth overnight, how long before all trace of humankind vanished? That’s the provocative, and occasionally puckish, question posed by Weisman (An Echo in My Blood) in this imaginative hybrid of solid science reporting and morbid speculation. Days after our disappearance, pumps keeping Manhattan’s subways dry would fail, tunnels would flood, soil under streets would sluice away and the foundations of towering skyscrapers built to last for centuries would start to crumble. At the other end of the chronological spectrum, anything made of bronze might survive in recognizable form for millions of years—along with one billion pounds of degraded but almost indestructible plastics manufactured since the mid-20th century. Meanwhile, land freed from mankind’s environmentally poisonous footprint would quickly reconstitute itself, as in Chernobyl, where animal life has returned after 1986’s deadly radiation leak, and in the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea, a refuge since 1953 for the almost-extinct goral mountain goat and Amur leopard. From a patch of primeval forest in Poland to monumental underground villages in Turkey, Weisman’s enthralling tour of the world of tomorrow explores what little will remain of ancient times while anticipating, often poetically, what a planet without us would be like.” Much of this is probably fairly speculative but it sounds interesting.

Hope you found something interesting. Come back next week for the next exciting installment!

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Responses

  1. The World Without Us does sound fascinating. I’ve just placed it on my “hold” list at the library…I’m number 14 on the list and it is not on the shelves yet, so it may be a while before I get my hands on it. Thanks for the heads-up.

  2. Sam – You’re welcome, glad you found something of interest here, that’s the whole point of my doing these posts!

  3. They all sound interesting.


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